Established in 2008, the MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund has two aims: education and environmental protection, both vital to the social needs of the worldwide community. Through the Fund, donations are made, sponsorships funded and partnerships established with charities, colleges and non-governmental organisations worldwide.

 


Philanthropy and Charitable Donations

The Nepal earthquake in April 2015 killed more than 9,000 people and injured more than 23,000. Hundreds of thousands of people were made homeless with entire villages flattened, across many districts of the country. “MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund” has donated HK$160,000 in supporting the Hong Kong Red Cross Nepal Earthquake 2015 relief and development work.

The Sichuan Earthquake happened on 12 May 2008 and Typhoon Morakot hit Taiwan on 8 August 2008, leaving numerous people homeless and countless casualties. In response to appeals from the Hong Kong Red Cross, “MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund” has donated HK$3 Million and HK$500,000 for immediate relief assistance and implementation of long-term reconstruction plans in the affected areas, and to provide food, warm clothing and other emergency supplies for the victims, via Hong Kong Red Cross.

In appreciation of our generous support of the relief works for the disastrous catastrophes that occurred in 2008, the Hong Kong Red Cross has presented “MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund” with a Certificate of Commendation during the Hong Kong Red Cross Relief Donor Award Ceremony.

Research Project with Royal College of Art

With the aim of exploring the psychology of lighting space and the practicalities of achieving lower light levels while satisfying user needs, MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund collaborated with the Helen Hamlyn Centre at the Royal College of Art. The research project sought a more creative, energy-efficient approach to lighting environment, based on practical exemplars utilizing low-energy light sources that lead to reduced light levels. The project not only encouraged the integration of eco-elements into lighting environment, but also contributed to the development of new strategies for sustainable lighting.

The research has reviewed two trends in architectural lighting: a sustainable approach where ambient levels of light are reduced to below half that recommended in the Code for Lighting; and a ‘well-being’ approach where levels are raised to be ‘biologically significant’ and stimulate alertness.

 

Light Volumes, Dark Matters (2008-10)

This book is the outcome of a two-year project carried out at the Royal College of Art Helen Hamlyn Centre supported by the MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund. The project set out to investigate why levels of artificial light in commercial interiors are increasing and explore more efficient ways of lighting space than with a uniform lighting layout. The primary concern of the research was the impact that high levels of light have on the people who work under it.

The Book Launch Seminar and Webinar

Light Volumes, Dark Matters, the book set to challenge current practices in workplace environment lighting, was launched at the end of September 2010 to an audience of 100 plus designers and architects at the Royal College of Art, London.

Please click here for more information.

 

In The Shade: Lighting Local Urban
Communities (2010-12)

The second collaboration between the Royal College of Art Helen Hamlyn Centre and the MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund was carried out along with the publication of ‘In The Shade: Lighting Local Urban Communities’. The research project set out to explore how light be used more progressively in the public realm in order to create a truly sustainable approach to lighting development. Through its engagement with diverse communities of the Boundary Estate in East London, and its lighting design of a new system, it succeeded to propose a radical new way to make neglected corners of the city more liveable.

The Book Launch Seminar and Webinar

In The Shade: Lighting Local Urban Communities, the book set to challenge why some areas of the city are over-illuminated but other pockets of the urban fabric left in the dark, was launched at the end of September 2012 to an audience of almost 200 designers and architects at the Royal College of Art, London.

Please click here for more information.

 

Lighting for Learning (2012-2014)

The third collaboration between Royal College of Art Helen Hamlyn Centre and MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund explored future lighting for learning environments. In response to MEGAMAN® Charity Trust Fund's dual interests in education and environmental protection, a two-year study carried out between 2012 and 2014. Titled ‘Lighting for Learning’, the study investigated new strategies for sustainable lighting in the public realm. Classrooms were the focus of the study which aimed at exploring alternative, low-energy ways to light up the classrooms and support learning. Through engagement with users in London, Hong Kong and Trondheim, Norway, the study collected their feedback on a lighting set-up which improved mood and motivation, and a lighting guide for teachers and school managers who are often unaware of the impact of light on the learning process. The study successfully challenged the conventional thinking that by simply providing more lighting, students will have better concentration. With the given feedback, it is found that classroom lighting set-up should adopt a more human-centred approach which considers the biological and psychological needs of teachers and students.

The Book Launch Seminar and Webinar

“Switch On: Lighting for Learning in The Secondary School Classroom” is a lighting guide written specifically for teachers and school managers who are often unaware of the impact of light can have on the learning process and aims to equip those on the frontline of education with some simple principles and ideas about how to harness the power of light – both natural and artificial – to improve well-being and performance in the classroom.

Please click here for more information.